Turmeric

Turmeric and especially its most active compound
curcumin have many scientifically-proven health benefits , such as the potential to prevent heart disease,⁸ Alzheimer’s and cancer. It’s a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant and may also help improve symptoms of depression and arthritis.

HIV Rash: What Does It Look Like and How Is It Treated?

Medically reviewed by Daniel Murrell, MD onJanuary 26, 2018 — Written by the Healthline Editorial Team

If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works.

Rash as an early symptom of HIV

A rash is a symptom of HIV that usually occurs within the first two months after contracting the virus. Like other initial symptoms of HIV, it’s easy to mistake this rash for a symptom of another viral infection. Therefore, it’s important to learn how to identify this rash and how to treat it.

Skin changes

According to UC San Diego Health, 90 percent of people who are living with HIV experience skin symptoms and changes at some stage of the disease.

The rash can develop because of conditions caused by HIV, or it can be a side effect of medications that treat HIV, called antiretroviral drugs.

Medication alert

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that three main classes of antiretroviral drugs are responsible for causing skin rashes:

NNRTIs such as nevirapine (Viramune) are the most common cause of medication skin rashes. Abacavir (Ziagen) is an NRTI drug that can cause skin rashes. The most likely PIs to cause rashes are amprenavir (Agenerase) and tipranavir (Aptivus).

Pictures of HIV rash

How can face mask protect someone

  • Before putting on a mask, clean hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.
  • Cover mouth and nose with mask and make sure there are no gaps between your face and the mask.
  • Avoid touching the mask while using it; if you do, clean your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.
  • Replace the mask with a new one as soon as it is damp and do not re-use single-use masks.
  • To remove the mask: remove it from behind (do not touch the front of mask); discard immediately in a closed bin; clean hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.

Corona virus

Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Most countries around the world have seen cases of COVID-19 and many are experiencing outbreaks. Authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing their outbreaks. However, the situation is unpredictable so check regularly for the latest news.

Protecting yourself and others from the spread COVID-19

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple precautions:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and others. Why? When someone coughs, sneezes, or speaks they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person has the disease.
  • Avoid going to crowded places. Why? Where people come together in crowds, you are more likely to come into close contact with someone that has COIVD-19 and it is more difficult to maintain physical distance of 1 metre (3 feet).
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately and wash your hands. Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
  • Stay home and self-isolate even with minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house, wear a mask to avoid infecting others. Why? Avoiding contact with others will protect them from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
  • If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention, but call by telephone in advance if possible and follow the directions of your local health authority. Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.
  • Keep up to date on the latest information from trusted sources, such as WHO or your local and national health authorities. Why? Local and national authorities are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

Advice on the safe use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers

To protect yourself and others against COVID-19, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash your hands with soap and water. If you use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, make sure you use and store it carefully.

  • Keep alcohol-based hand sanitizers out of children’s reach. Teach them how to apply the sanitizer and monitor its use.
  • Apply a coin-sized amount on your hands. There is no need to use a large amount of the product.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose immediately after using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, as it can cause irritation.
  • Hand sanitizers recommended to protect against COVID-19 are alcohol-based and therefore can be flammable. Do not use before handling fire or cooking.
  • Under no circumstance, drink or let children swallow an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. It can be poisonous. 
  • Remember that washing your hands with soap and water is also effective against COVID-19.

Making a COVID-19 vaccine

The pathogen at the center of the outbreak, SARS-CoV-2, belongs to the family of viruses known as coronaviruses. This family is so named because, under a microscope, they appear with crownlike projections on their surface. 

In developing a vaccine that targets SARS-CoV-2, scientists are looking at these projections intensely. The projections enable the virus to enter human cells where it can replicate and make copies of itself. They’re known as “spike proteins” or “S” proteins. Researchers have been able to map the projections in 3D, and research suggests they could be a viable antigen in any coronavirus vaccine. 

That’s because the S protein is prevalent in coronaviruses we’ve battled in the past — including the one that caused the SARS outbreak in China in 2002-03. This has given researchers a head start on building vaccines against part of the S protein and, using animal models, they’ve demonstrated they can generate an immune response.

There are many companies across the world working on a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, developing different ways to stimulate the immune system. Some of the most talked about approaches are those using a relatively novel type of vaccine known as a “nucleic acid vaccine.” These vaccines are essentially programmable, containing a small piece of genetic code to act as the antigen. 

Corona virus infection:

The coronavirus has spread across the globe with speed and ferocity, reaching almost every country on the planet. The world has been sent into lockdown in an attempt to flatten the curve and prevent health care systems from being overwhelmed. Major events, including the Tokyo Olympics, have been postponed or canceled altogether. As health authorities and governments continue to mitigate extensive transmission in the community, scientists and researchers are turning their attention to another goal: Development of treatments and vaccines.

Since coronavirus was first discovered as the causative agent of COVID-19, scientists have been racing to get a better understanding of the virus’ genetic makeup and unravel how to effectively treat infections. There’s no cure and medical specialists can only treat the symptoms of the disease. Many different treatment options have been proposed and some older drugs seem to be associated with positive outcomes — but much more work is required. However, the long-term strategy to combat COVID-19, which has spread to every continent on Earth besides Antarctica, is to develop a vaccine.

Selfcare If you feel sick you should rest, drink plenty of fluid, and eat nutritious food. Stay in a separate room from other family members, and use a dedicated bathroom if possible. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.Everyone should keep a healthy lifestyle at home. Maintain a healthy diet, sleep, stay active, and make social contact with loved ones through the phone or internet. Children need extra love and attention from adults during difficult times. Keep to regular routines and schedules as much as possible.It is normal to feel sad, stressed, or confused during a crisis. Talking to people you trust, such as friends and family, can help. If you feel overwhelmed, talk to a health worker or counsellor.

Having a Pet Can Boost Your Mood and Keep Your Brain Healthy

It’s long been said that dog is man’s best friend. But pets of any kind are beneficial to your health. Neurologist Marwan Sabbagh, MD, explains.Brain & SpineTame Your Tension Headaches Naturally

Tension headaches are extremely common. Try our tips for preventing stress and keeping the headaches away. Brain & SpineRage Rooms: Do They Offer Anger Relief or Reinforce Bad Behavior?

Feel like smashing something when you’re angry? Rage (or anger) rooms can help you with that. But they can’t help you learn to better express and manage your emotions.Brain & SpineWhat Are the Actual Warning Signs of a Brain Tumor?

A brain tumor expert shares seven brain tumor symptoms to watch out for and advises on the best type of place to seek brain tumor treatment. Plus, learn the signs of brain metastase

It’s long been said that dog is man’s best friend. But pets of any kind are beneficial to your health. Neurologist Marwan Sabbagh, MD, explains. Brain & SpineTame Your Tension Headaches Naturally

Tension headaches are extremely common. Try our tips for preventing stress and keeping the headaches away. Brain & SpineRage Rooms: Do They Offer Anger Relief or Reinforce Bad Behavior?

Feel like smashing something when you’re angry? Rage (or anger) rooms can help you with that. But they can’t help you learn to better express and manage your emotions.Brain & SpineWhat Are the Actual Warning Signs of a Brain Tumor?

A brain tumor expert shares seven brain tumor symptoms to watch out for and advises on the best type of place to seek brain tumor treatment. Plus, learn the signs of brain metastase

Brain & Spine

Brain & SpinePlanning to Start Exercising? Start with Your Core First

Strong core muscles help you maintain good posture. A physical therapist discusses why a strong core is important and gives exercises to try.Brain & SpineWhy Forest Therapy Can Be Good for Your Body and Mind

Forest therapy, a type of mindfulness practice, can help de-clutter your mind and boost your physical health, too. Find out how to work it into your life.Brain & Spine10 Things Parents Should Know About Children and Concussions

Learn 10 things parents should know about concussions in children, including concussion symptoms and which youth sports have the most concussions. Brain & SpineHow to Manage Stress Migraines During the Coronavirus Outbreak

How to avoid stress triggers and better manage your migraines during the coronavirus outbreak

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started